The Top 5 Mistakes Made after an On the Job Injury

The Top 5 Mistakes Made after an On the Job InjuryInjuries at work occur all the time. Many people aren’t prepared for this, which is understandable but can also lead to mistakes. If you suffer an injury at work, it is essential that you know what to do, and more importantly, what not to do. Some of the most common mistakes can wind up reducing the potential benefits and/or settlement you receive. As a result, you need to get to know the top five things to avoid doing after being injured on the job.

1: Failure to report the injury in a prompt manner.

According to workers compensation laws in Florida, you have to report an injury within a period of 30 days to your supervisor or employer. If the injury results in an occupational disease, you have 90 days to report it after the first sign of a problem.

Even though there are some exceptions, it isn’t worth suffering an injury and then having to fight for the compensation you deserve. You don’t need to wait to report an injury. Doing it as quickly as possible is the best way to safeguard your benefits.

2: Failure to disclose any previous injuries you had/have.

If you are reporting an injury that happened recently but failed to report a minor injury in the past, this could mean trouble. If you neglected to report a previous incident, it might result in you losing your compensation benefits altogether. There are some instances where this is considered fraud. Make sure you are transparent about any and all injuries you suffer; otherwise you may put future workers compensation benefits at risk.

3: Failing to report all the injuries that occur.

You need to make sure you report the full extent of your injuries to the doctor. For example, if you fell and injured your back, but also damaged your leg, you can’t forget to disclose this. If you don’t report secondary injuries and then try to bring them up later, it will look as though you are trying to claim more than what you are entitled to. You may also run the risk of being accused of fraud.

4: Not going back to work as soon as you can.

If you refuse to return to work when you can, even if it is for a lower paying position, this is considered a voluntary loss of income. If this occurs, you may lose the ability to receive further benefits or compensation. Even worse, your employer has the right to terminate you completely for your “refusal to work.”

5: Not having legal representation.

If you have suffered an injury while on the job, you need the help and representation that only a quality Florida worker’s compensation attorney can provide. The insurance company and your employer are going to have representation and you should, as well. This will help protect your rights and interests.

If you have suffered an injury on the job and need legal representation, contact worker’s compensation lawyer Scott J. Sternberg by calling 561-288-9096.

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